Reflection 3

Jeopardy Rocks! 

(and is fun to play in the classroom too!)


https://www.jeopardy.rocks/

Background:

Last semester for my math methods class I was placed in a 3rd grade classroom for my pre-practicum. When it came time to teach my lesson, the students were studying multiplication and division, and touching upon fact families and practicing word problems. Because this class was filled with students of many different learning, physical,

jeopardy-690
http://www.okayplayer.com/news/questlove-prince-aap-rocky-were-all-featured-as-jeopardy-answers-last-night.html

and behavioral disabilities, I thought for my full class lesson it would be fun to play a game with the students, that way all students would be engaged and participating. I decided to take these categories and make them into a math Jeopardy game for the students. I hand made cards with different multiplication, division, word, and fact family problems and ranked them from easiest (100 points) to hardest (400 points).

The Problem:

On the day of my lesson, I taped my math Jeopardy board up on the white board, and appointed a team captain (teams were pre-made based off where the students were sitting). After I explained the rules to the game, we were ready to play. As the game went

jeopardy-meme
http://memeguy.com/photo/101473/the-next-best-thing-to-getting-the-right-answer-on-jeopardy

on, I noticed some students were having trouble seeing the cards I made; even though I read each problem out loud so everyone heard me, I realized not everyone could see clearly, which was disadvantageous to them and ultimately to their team. I also realized that some of the students with disabilities were struggling to see and read the Jeopardy cards as well, which made it difficult for them to fully participate. I had to repeat myself a lot and remove the card from the board and scan it around the room so everyone to get a better look at it. After my lesson, I self-reflected and realized that maybe I should have used an online tool to present the game.

The Solution:

If I were to teach this lesson again, instead of making a hand made Jeopardy board, I would definitely use an online generator to facilitate problems that could arise, like the one that came up during my lesson. This would have solved the problem of the students having trouble seeing and reading the board. On the website, Jeopardy.rocks, the font is big, colorful, and engaging for the students, which is why it would have been better if i created my Jeopardy game from this site. By having the game projected on the board by using a technological tool instead of a hand made one, it would have been easier for all students to actively participate and work with their teams to find the answers to the problems. I created a board with problems similar to those I used during my lesson on this website (my game is in the link below). I wish I had found this website beforehand!

image2
The font and size of the writing is clear and big for optimal view. This is a picture taken from my phone from the game I created on this site..

My game can be found here:

https://www.jeopardy.rocks/multdivjeopardy

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